Collection Unit 1

Theme: Coming to America

Texts:

  • Close Reader: from The General History of Virginia
  • Close Reader: Mother Tongue
  • Close Reader: Indian Boy Love Song
  • “Blaxicans” and Other Reinvented Americans
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.2
Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.9
Analyze seventeenth-, eighteenth-, and nineteenth-century foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1
Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.4
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range of formal and informal tasks.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.11-12.1
Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

Formative Assessment:

  • passage annotations
  • passage summary
  • sentence paraphrasing
  • stating a central idea of a assigned passage and supporting it with evidence
  • discussions in a collaborative group
  • group presentation
  • Claim worksheet
  • developing an argument worksheet
  • counter claim worksheet

Summative Assessment: Unit Assessment -Writing an Argument Essay based on the Sources Provided in the student book

Pacing Calendar

Week 1( 9/11-15) Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6( 10/16-19)
Texts:

Of Plymouth Plantation

-Participating in a collaborative discussion

Assessment:
-Writing a Summary of the passages

-paraphrase

_ Uing DIDLS to analyze tone

-Writing about a central idea supported by textual evidence

Texts:

_ The General History of Virginia

-Mother Tongue
-Indian Boy Love Song

Texts:

-Balboa

Blaxican

Texts:

-Writing as  process

-Participating in a collaborative discussion

 

Texts: Student performance tasks

Lesson 1

Objective: The student will be able to determine the central ideas or themes of a fundational text.

CCSS

R1: Cite textual evidence.
RI2: Determine central ideas of a text.
RI 3   Analyze a complex sequence of events and explain how individuals, ideas, or events interact.
RI : Determine an author’s purpose in a text
RI 10  Read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 11-CCR text complexity band

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with translators & dictionaries to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( annotation guidelines & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts are provided for students to annotate a text.

Products: Various strategies are taught and choices provided to help students complete a task based on their individual abilities.

Do Now: What comes to your mind when you hear the term precolonial and colonial America? Any specific imagery, setting or narrative? Write down your ideas on a personal whiteboard.

Mini Lesson:( Of Plymouth Plantation resources)

  1. Paraphrasing: https://my.hrw.com/content/hmof/language_arts/hmhcollections2017/resources/common/level_up/lit302/index.html
  2. How does an author structure a series of events sequentially?
  3. How to actively participate in a collaborative discussion?

Video Title – The Lost Colony of Roanoke

Take notes for the following questions. You may quote directly or paraphrase the key points that you will hear.

Guided Practice

  1. What was the precolonial America like? Can you describe it?
  2. How did people travel during the time to cross the Atlantic to get to the new continent? What were the conditions of the ship like? Can you name one of the ships?
  3. What did people believe?
  4. What roles did England, Spain and France played in the period of exploration and settlement?

Independent practice

In a small collaborative group:

  • Summarize the roles England, Spain and France played in the period of exploration and settlement
  • How does an author structure a series of events sequentially?
  • Follow the rules of a productive group discussion

Homework: Read two pages of Of Plymouth Plantation and annotate the passages.

Lesson 2

Objectives: Students will be able to determine central ideas of a text through annotation and examining author’s purpose, and rhetorical features.

Do Now: Share one strategy you used to annotate the text. Why do we annotate? Pair-share.

 Mini Lesson:

Of Plymouth Plantation, is a historical account—it tells a true story about events that happened in the past. The events are told mainly in chronological order, or the order in which they happened. The text is also a primary source, because the author, William Bradford, observed the events personally. Bradford’s vivid details and chronological structure give readers the sense that they are experiencing events right along with the Plymouth settlers. Bradford’s narrative is a foundational text because of its great significance in U.S. history. It provides a rare first-hand account of experiences from the early seventeenth century, when Europeans were establishing some of their first permanent settlements in North America. You can better understand Bradford’s account by looking at the following elements.

Annotation and central ideas

The Steps – on the left hand side of the text

  1. Number the paragraphs – if there’s dialogue, then each line of text is a new paragraph
  2. Circle the descriptive words or important nouns that pop out at you
  3. Underline figurative language and important passages – text that might indicate foreshadowing or the author figuring something out
  4. Summarize each paragraph in a few words
  5.  Chunk the paragraphs together by the ideas contained within them – put brackets around them
  6. Write down what the purpose of the chunk is
  7. Write down the main idea of the passage that you’ve been asked to annotate
  8. Another important part of annotating the text is that you start ‘talking to’ the text and asking it questions. The more questions you ask, the more likely you are to find the answer by yourself.  If the author’s argument does not make sense, then you need to note that down too!

The Steps – on the right hand side of the text

  1. Write down any questions that you have about the text – vocabulary, purpose, etc
  2. If you find answers to your questions, be sure to answer them!
  3. Do you agree with the argument that is being presented – by the characters? By the author? What’s the counterargument?

Guided Practice

Paraphrase and annotation

Day 3

Objectives: Students will be able to close read a passage a passage from Of Plymouth Plantation by using the acronym DIDLS.

CCSS

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings;

Differentiation:

  • Content: Students are provided with translators & dictionaries to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( annotation guidelines & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts are provided for students to annotate a text.
  • Products: Various strategies are taught and choices provided to help students complete a task based on their individual abilities.

Mini Lesson

What’s the acronym DIDLS? How do we use to to help us read closely

Teacher Modeling🙁 See Teacher Edition page 19)

Close reading screencast  2 & 1

Screencast 1: from Of Plymouth Plantation 01 (lines 47-56)

-Screencast 2 – from Of Plymouth Plantation 02 (lines 178-185)

Respond: What strategies did the speakers use to discuss the passage?

Guided Practice: Read a paragraph together and complete the following for your annotations:

  • new vocabulary:
  • important details:
  • questions:
  • summary:
  • tone & author’s purpose:
  • example of figurative language:

Independent Practice:

In a small group, students will read and annotate a passage and close-read a passage to bring out a central idea of the passage.

Quick Write: State at least one central idea from the passage you have read closely.( Exit Slip)

Homework: Pick a passage from the narrative. Annotate it. Pick one sentence to paraphrase. What’s the passage about?

___________________________________________

9/12 Period 7: Baseline assessment

Objectives: Students will be able to respond to writing prompts after reading the two sources.

CCSS:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.1.A
Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Do NOW: Pick up a baseline assessment and loose leafs.

Your Task: You will have the full period to read two sources, annotate them before you respond in writing the questions posed at the end of the 2nd source.

Exit Slip: Hand in your annotated texts and written responses to the questions.

_________________________________

Lesson 4:

Objectives: Students will be able to determine central ideas through collaborative group discussions and close reading.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

RI2: Determine central ideas of a text.

Differentiation:

  • Content: Students are provided with translators & dictionaries to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( annotation guidelines & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts are provided for students to annotate a text.
  • Products: Various strategies are taught and choices provided to help students complete a task based on their individual abilities.

Mini Lesson:

Think of a scenario where you see the values and importance of collaborative work , in a corporate setting, university, public institutions and small businesses. Share.

Guided Practice

Students close read a passage and assign a role to each member in the group. Work collaboratively to answer the questions. Each group should have a Moderator, Time Keeper, Recorder and Participant(s).

Independent Practice

Work on the 2nd half of the passage, work collaboratively to respond to the next three questions. Each group hands in one answer sheet.

Exit Slip: Hand in your completed worksheet.

__________________________________________

Lesson 5

Objectives: Students will determine central ideas of a passage through the use of reading strategies such as DIDLS.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1
Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

RI2: Determine central ideas of a text.

Differentiation:

  • Content: Students are provided with translators & dictionaries to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( annotation guidelines & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts are provided for students to annotate a text.
  • Products: Various strategies are taught and choices provided to help students complete a task based on their individual abilities.

Mini Lesson

  • What does DIDLS stand for? Why do we use the strategy?
  • What’s a central idea? How do we generate them? Teacher models close-reading a passage.

A central idea should be-

  • a generalized statement ( not a fact but your opinion based on your understanding of the text) with no specific details
  • supported by the textual evidence in the passage
  • debatable
  • textual details should include example stated in DIDLS
  • connected  with Tone or author’s attitude through the using the strategy DIDLS

Guided Practice

Students read a passage and use the DIDLS worksheet to analyze the passage. Determine the tone and a central idea.

Use ” hot seat” to elicit answers.

Determining central ideas using the Method-

The Method: Identify the following patterns:

  • What’s being repeated( repetition)?
  • What’s in opposition( contrast/opposition)?
  • What does’t fit( anomaly)?

Based on the Method, write a sentence to state a central idea of the passage.

Independent Practice

Select a passage from the narrative. Read closely to determine central ideas in a collaborative group through reading and discussion. Use the worksheet to help you complete the task.

Use the NYS Literary analysis rubric to evaluate your central ideas and supporting evidence.

Exit Slip: Hand in the central idea worksheet.

Homework: If you didn’t finish the worksheet, take take home and finish it. Bring it to the class tomorrow.

___________________________________________________________

Lesson 6: Writing a well-developed paragraph to illustrate a central idea

RI2: Determine central ideas of a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings;

Differentiation:

  • Content: Students are provided with translators & dictionaries to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( annotation guidelines & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts are provided for students to annotate a text. The class is co-taught by a content teacher and a push-in ENL teacher.
  • Products: Various strategies are taught and choices provided to help students complete a task based on their individual abilities.

Objectives: Students will be able to evacuate and revise their paragraph about a central idea by using the model paragraph provided.

Do Now: Raise one question you are stills struggling with about DIDLS reading strategy and central idea.

Mini Lesson and Guided Practice

What do you notice about the paragraph? Make a list of important characteristics of a well-developed paragraph.

The author reveals that people’s survival in a harsh circumstance is all up to God’s will ( topic sentencecentral idea). In the passage, Bradford describes how people cram into the ship, many of whom are sick and yet miraculously survive the long journey. To contrast, he also describes an able young man who acts wickedly toward people and dies in the end. (a critical summary of the text as a context). First( transition), Bradford uses diction to convey the tone of hopelessness ( 1st example of literary device). He describes, “These trouble being blown over, and now all being compact together in one ship, they put to sea again…many were afflicted with seasickness.”(textual evidence)  The words “blown over” and “compact together” emphasize the rough conditions these passengers are in where there are too many people for the ship, which is unhealthy. In addition, the word “inflicted” shows these people are severely suffering from sea sickness. These words all together reveal how hopeless the circumstances are for these passengers on the ship, which makes readers wonder if they will survive. The sense of uncertainty creates doubt and hopelessness (analysis/commentary). In contrast( transition), Bradford uses imagery to portray a particular young man who has a “lusty and able body” but acts in a “proud, very profane” and “haughty” way. He even “curses them [the sick passengers] daily with grievous excretions” and hopes to “cast them off overboard”( 2nd example of literary device). Through the imagery, the author helps the reader see a rude and apathetic young man who seems to be abusive to other passengers, which adds to the severity of the situation on the sea. The contrast adds the tension to the story and reveals a tone of anxiety (analysis /commentary). Yet( transition), through the repetition of allusion (language device) to God, as in “a special work of God’s providence” and “It pleased God before they came half seas over, to smite the young man with a grievous disease, of which he died…and was thrown overboard” to “the just hand of God”( 3rd example of literary device), Bradford contributes people’s survival of the journey to God’s will( commentary) . By letting the sick survive and the wicked albeit strong die, the author uses the antithesis to confirm that people’s lives are in the hands of God- the good will be saved and wicked condemned( connecting back to the central idea).

Share your observations in a speed-dating activity.

Student Independent Practice

Students use the notes from the model paragraph to revise and type their paragraph.

Lesson Assessment: Students hand in both 1st and revised drafts of the paragraph.

___________________________________________

Lesson 7 : Reading “The General History of Virginia”

Objectives: Students will determine central ideas of the passage through analyzing the point of view and conflict used by the author in a collaborative group.

RI2: Determine central ideas of a text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings;

R1: Cite textual evidence.

Differentiation:

  • Content: Students are provided with translators & dictionaries to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary.
  • Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( annotation guidelines & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts are provided for students to annotate a text. The class is co-taught by a content teacher and a push-in ENL teacher.
  • Products: Various strategies are taught and choices provided to help students complete a task based on their individual abilities.

Do Now: What does today’s ” objectives” mean to you? What do we do when we don’t understand the words or sentences we read? ( 7 minutes)

Mini Lesson:

Teacher model close reading strategy  in a “Fishbowl” using  Reciprocal Teaching activity.

  • review of annotation techniques ( 3 minutes)
  • Read lines 1-17 and as a class ( 2 minutes), respond to the questions on pages 3 & 4. ( 10 minutes)
  • Circle the main problem. Underline phrases that describe Wingfield’s behavior.

Reciprocal Teaching  ( 15 minutes)

  1. Summarize the passage
  2. Questioning: What’s the problem discussed? How would you describe Wingfield’s behavior? Find details.
  • What’s the most important detail to you in the passage? What does it reveal?
  • Reflecting (processing): why is it important?
  • Relating the materials to one’s personal life (process information more deeply): how does this relate to you in a way?
  • Further Questioning: what questions has the activity raised for you?
  1. Classifying: Is there any place in the passage about which you feel confused? Can anyone in the group help explain it?
    4. Making a claim: What’s the central idea? Do you agree? Why or why not?

Student Independent Practice ( 30 minutes)

Students read line 18-41 and use reciprocal teaching method to discuss the passage and respond t questions by using the lesson tool provided.

Reciprocal Teaching

  1. Summarizing (contextualizing): After students have silently/audibly read a passage, a student acting as a teacher summarizes what has been read. Other students may add to the summary and modify it.
  2. Questioning: The student leader asks some questions to which the group members respond. The questions re meant to help students identify important information in the passage.
  3. Classifying: The student leader tries to clarify confusing points in the passage. The group attempts to clear up the confusing parts.
  4. Predicting/Making a Claim: How does this passage connect to the overall meaning of the text? The student leader tries to make a claim about the passage and the rest of the group respond to it by agreeing, disagreeing, modifying and supporting the claim with textual evidence).

Exit Slip: Hand in the lesson tool for assessment.

 

 

 

 

 

MCQs: four corners